Facts about bumblebees

Did you know there is a special day for bees in May? Watch this video to find out why bees are so important.

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Transcript

Pollination is very important because it helps plants, flowers and food crops to grow, so that we have lots of lovely things to eat. One in every three spoonfuls of our food started off as crops pollinated by bees and other insects. And food such as tomatoes, aubergines, blueberries and cranberries all rely on bumblebees. 

So how does it work? Well, when a bee lands on a flower to feed and suck up nectar or gather pollen, extra pollen sticks to the hairs on its body. When the bee flies to the next flower, the extra pollen from the bumblebee's body sticks to the new flower, and this is called pollination. When the pollen reaches the right part of the new flower, it turns the flower into a fruit that contains seeds from which new plants can grow.  

Farms all over the world rely on bumblebees to spread pollen around their crops. Imagine that. What clever bumblebees!

© BBC

Discussion

Do you like bees? Which insects do you see where you live? Tell us about them!

Average: 5 (3 votes)

Submitted by ShinyLuteRainforest on Wed, 27/10/2021 - 14:04

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I do not like bees because they can sting you

Submitted by ShinyLuteRainforest on Wed, 27/10/2021 - 11:27

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I like bees becasue they make sweet honey for us but if they are angry they can sting.

Submitted by QueenSkippingX… on Thu, 12/08/2021 - 02:40

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I like the games

English courses for children aged 6-17

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